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Philatelic Rarities

Preface

Stamp collecting is not only an elegant hobby but also the epitome of history. In order to bring these historical memories back, the Chunghwa Post selects 14 philatelic rarities to display. At first, you will see the “Empress Dowager’s Birthday Commemorative Issue” commemorating the 60th birthday of Empress Dowager. The overprinted “Provisional Neutrality Issue” and “Republic of China & Provisional Neutrality Issue” represented the hardships in the early stage while the Republic of China established. After that, “The First Peking Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue” was released to feature country’s affairs operating steadily, a plentiful harvest, civilized people, and culture development. The original Shanghai Print Flying Geese stamps and its overprinted series as well as “Cheng Cheng-kung Issue ”were presented to show the financial and social status going steadily and gradually. These philatelic items are rarely recorded. Now, please enjoy these philatelic rarities and recall the historical stories we possess together.

1.2.Empress Dowager’s Birthday Commemorative Issue

  • Com. 1.2
  • Com. 1.9
November 7, 1894 was the Empress Dowager Cixi’s 60th birthday. Robert Hart, the Inspector General of the Customs Service of Imperial China, suggested issuing a set of commemorat ive stamps to mark the occasion. For cultural reasons, instead of bearing her likeness, the stamps celebrat ing her birthday feature designs with symbolic meanings, such as “Five Auspicious Bats Offering Longevity,” “Longevity Flowers,” “Reishi Mushrooms,” “Peonies,” “Dragon Playing with a Pearl,” and “Smooth Sailing.” The set comprises nine stamps, These were China’s first commemorative stamps. A total of 40 (2x4x5) denomination 2-candarin and a total of 25 (5 by 5 pieces) of denomination 24-candarin are displayed.

3.Provisional Neutrality Issue with denomination of 2-dollars

  • Def. 12.3
When the Republic of China was established, the Temporary Republic government leaded by the Provisional President Dr. Sun Yat-Sen in Nanking asked the Directorate of General Posts in Peking to overprint the Dragon, Jumping Carp, and Flying Goose Issue with 4 Chinese characters “Republic of China” for temporary use to represent the political regime transferred, but the French T. Piry, Inspector General of Directorate of General Posts, had another thought and asked the Customs Stat istical Department Shanghai to overprint with 4 Chinese characters “Provisional Neutrality” instead. This set has 15 denominations. However, this set of stamps was prohibited from selling and was recalled under the strongest protest from the Temporary Republic government in Nanking, but there were st ill four kinds of stamps sold in Foochow Post Off ice off icially at the end of January 1912. 48 stamps in whole sheet with 2-dollars denomination are displayed.

4.Republic of China & Provisional Neutrality Issue with denomination of 5-dollars

  • Def. 13.8
After the “Provisional Neutrality” Issue had been opposed and recalled, the Inspector General of Directorate of General Posts, T. Piry, asked the Customs Stat ist ical Department Shanghai to re-overprint the Provisional Neutrality Issue with 4 Chinese characters “Republic of China” vertically, which formed a cross with the original 4 Chinese characters. This did not fulfill the needs from the Temporary Republic government in Nanking, but represented the political conflict. 48 stamps in whole sheet (8 by 6 pieces) of denomination 5-dollars are displayed.

5.6.7.London Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue

  • Def. 17.1
  • Def. 17.13
  • Def. 17.19
Following the founding of the Republic of China, the main design of postage stamps was rearranged. The first stamp issue bearing the new design was “London Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue” (1913). The issue was printed by Waterlow & Sons Co., London. It comprises 19 denominations in three designs. They are: 1. Junk stamp: 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8,10¢ 2. Reaper stamp: 15, 16, 20, 30, 50¢ 3. Hall of Classics: $1, $2, $5, $10. The whole sheet consist ing 200 (8x5x5) pieces each of 1/2¢and 20¢denominations as well as one consist ing 50(10x5) pieces stamps of 10-dollars denomination are displayed.

8.1st Peking Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue with denomination of 20-dollars

  • Def. 18.22
During the beginning of the Republic of China foundation, the major themes for definitive stamps are sailing boat, farmer harvesting and Hall of Classics which features country’s affairs proceeding smoothly without a hitch, a plentiful harvest, wealthy people, and culture development. The London Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue was issued firstly on May, 1913, and then the First Peking Print was released since 1914 by Print ing Bureau of the Ministry of Finance in Peking. The whole sheet consist ing 50 (10 by 5) pieces of the Hall of Classics stamps of 20-dollars denomination is displayed.

9.2nd Peking Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics Issue with denomination of 20-dollars

  • Def. 20.24
When the quantity of the 1st Peking Print Junk, Reaper, and Hall of Classics stamps was gradually depleted, new plates of the original designs were engraved by the Print ing Bureau of the Ministry of Finance, Peking, in 1923, for the second print bearing the same denominations. Among them, the 4¢stamp was printed into two colors: grey and oliver while the 6¢stamp red and brown making it a set of 24 stamps. 50 stamps in whole sheet (10 by 5 pieces) of denomination 20-dollars are displayed.

10.Cheng Cheng-kung Issue

  • Def. 75.13
The government of the Republic of China moved to Taipei on December 9, 1949. Soon afterwards, the new currency was adopted in Taiwan. The design of the first stamp issue in the new currency was released on June 26, 1950, featuring the portrait of a patriotic hero General Cheng Cheng-kung copied from a drawing kept in the Taiwan Provincial Museum. The issue consists of 13 stamps with the denominations of 3, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, 50, 80¢and $1, 1.5, 1.6, 2, 5 respectively. 200 stamps in whole sheet (10 by 20 pieces) of denominat ion 5-dollars are displayed.

11.The Whole Sheet of Shanghai Print Flying Geese Stamps without any denomination

  • Def. 75.13
After the Directorate General of Posts of the Republic of China retreated to Taipei and started to operation in December of 1949, before the newly printed stamps issued, the Directorate General of Posts overprinted some stamps carried from China with New Taiwan Dollars denomination for postage use. This sheet bearing no denomination is one of the examples. The whole sheet consist ing of 20x10 pieces (200 pieces totally) is the excellent rare philatelic collect ion in Taiwan.

12.13.14.Shanghai Print Flying Geese Overprinted Stamps

  • Def 73.5
  • Def 76.4
  • Def. 78.3
There are 3 overprints with New Taiwan Dollars on the Shanghai Print Flying Geese Stamps bearing no denomination. The first overprint was with small characters on denominations of 1-dollar, 2-dollars, 5-dollars, 10-dollars and 20-dollars and issued on January 1, 1950; The second overprint on 1- dollar denomination; The third overprint on denomination of 2-dollars. The second overprint was large characters and oval panel on denominations of 5-dollars, 10-dollars, 20-dollars and 50-dollars, and issued on July 19, 1951. The third overprint was large characters and rectangular panel on denominations of 10-dollars, 20-dollars and 50-dollars, and issued on December 8, 1952. The first 20-dollars-denomination overprin with small characters consist ing 20 by 10, 200 pieces, the second 50-dollars-denomination overprint with 50 pieces, and the third 50-dollars-denominat ion overprint with 100 pieces are displayed. All are the only record of the whole sheet or the maximum block.
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